Always backup, backup, and backup. Did I say to backup?

I replaced the SSD in my system a week ago and sold off the old SSD, which had an encrypted local partition with Wildfire’s source-code on it.
Now, Wildfire’s source-code (as well as the source of some of my other projects) is stored on an encrypted drive on my server, so I didn’t need the data on the Wildfire partition on the SSD. Of cause because I use a Windows domain everything was backed up to my server, so I went ahead and wiped the SSD clean before sending it off.

I use AWS (Amazon Web Services) to host Wildfire, and AWS protects passwords to instances with private keys, and the private key for the instance Wildfire was running on was stored on the same partition on my SSD that the Wildfire source-code was stored on. You probably know the rest.

At the moment I’m rebuilding the instance that Wildfire was running on, and service should be restored shortly.
The big problem was that I thought that I’d backed the private key up onto my server, but that didn’t happen. Part of data security (especially to comply with data protection regulation, which I broke!) is to ensure the backup is accessible. It just happened to be that everything except the private key file was backed up, due to how Windows and the cloud storage service I use handles certain file extensions (files are backed up onto my server, which then uploads everything onto cloud storage).

Within the next couple of weeks I’m aiming to migrate Wildfire onto Microsoft SQL Server, away from its current SQLite implementation. This would mitigate at least some of the data issues.

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